Author Archives: karinevarley

Britain, France and Europe: Reassessments

On 22 May 2018, I and my Strathclyde colleague, Dr Rogelia Pastor-Castro, led a debate on the history of relations between the UK and France and what shape their future relations might take post-Brexit. Hosted by the French Ambassador to … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Paris Commune of 1871

The Paris Commune was long held up by Marxists as the archetypal proletarian government – rule by the workers for the workers. Observing the violent insurrection, and the numerous political clubs that sprang up everywhere, Marx was inspired to declare … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Was the Franco-Prussian War a Modern or Total War?

Total war The term was first coined by Ludendorff 1918 to signify a departure from previous modes of conflict. It essentially involved the necessary mobilisation of material, intellectual, and moral energies against all legitimate objects of war. In fact, the … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The French Defeat in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71

In the eyes of many, the French defeat of 1871 had been nothing less than ‘the greatest military collapse recorded by history’. Within the space of only six months, France had lost the war, lost Alsace-Lorraine, and lost its self-belief. … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Corsican nationalism twenty years after the assassination of Prefect Claude Erignac

On Tuesday 6 February 2018, Emmanuel Macron is due to make his first visit to Corsica since being elected French President. The occasion will be to mark twenty years since the assassination of Prefect Claude Erignac in Ajaccio by Corsican … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Relations between Britain and France in World War Two

Institut Français d’Ecosse, Edinburgh, 3 May 2017 Roundtable speakers: Professor Peter Jackson (Glasgow) and Dr Emile Chabal (Edinburgh) When war was declared in September 1939, Britain and France stood together as allies with similar democratic traditions, levels of military and … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Call for Papers: Society for the Study of French History 31st Annual Conference ‘France, Europe and the World’

Call for Papers: Society for the Study of French History 31st Annual Conference ‘France, Europe and the World’ University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, 26-27 June 2017 Confirmed plenary speakers: Professor Robert Gildea (Oxford) Professor John Merriman (Yale) Professor Sophie Wahnich (CNRS) … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

BBC Monitoring and French Radio during the Second World War

Introduction On 28 June 1940, Alexis Léger, the former head of the French Foreign Ministry told Winston Churchill that against a background of growing anti-British sentiment in France following the defeat, Britain might make use of the fact that BBC … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Italy’s Decade of War: 1935-45 in International Perspective

University of Strathclyde, 6-7 September 2016 Keynote speakers:  Professor MacGregor Knox, London School of Economics Professor Nicola Labanca, Università degli Studi di Siena   Registration now open: http://onlineshop.strath.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=157&catid=68&prodid=538 From the invasion of Abyssinia to the end of World War Two, Italy experienced … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

‘Imprisoned in the Vatican’: Neutrality and the Challenges Facing the French Embassy to the Holy See in World War Two

Paper presented at ‘Embassies in Crisis’ conference, British Academy, 9 June 2016 Introduction The case of the French embassy to the Holy See in the Second World War was very different to the other embassies being discussed today, given the … Continue reading

Posted in Corsica | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment